click here for a fantastic brief interview with Mr. Prince as "the Subway Busker" for New York Times' critically acclaimed oral/visual piece entitled "ONE - IN 8 MILLION"

interviewed and produced by Emily S. Rueb. Photographed by Todd Heisler

click here for a fantastic brief interview with Mr. Prince as "the Subway Busker" for New York Times' critically acclaimed oral/visual piece entitled "ONE - IN 8 MILLION"

interviewed and produced by Emily S. Rueb. Photographed by Todd Heisler

Henrique "Rique" Prince

Henrique aka "Rique" 
was born in Harlem, NYC. He began playing the violin as a child and completely immersed himself in both classical and the rich American folk violin styles. Later he studied classical with Charles Meacham of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra.

Since Rique's father and uncles were bandleaders in the West Indies leading successful dance bands - this legacy would prove to be a rite of passage for Henrique's destiny. Henrique would, for over 40 years, perform fiddle tunes solo and with others, thus creating his own dance band of String based folk music - known initially as the Henrique Prince duo/trio and then later - The EBONY HILLBILLIES (which was named by its first bassist, Dave Colding).

Rique also played with numerous charanga bands, jazz ensembles, reggae bands and guesting with such music pioneers as The Sun Ra Arkestra, alternative Country band - The Palace Bros., and with late nite television's Saturday Night Live Band. Nevertheless his heart always brought him back to the ole timey String Band tradition.

He has taught worldwide sharing the history of the African-American String Band tradition and experience with The EBONY HILLBILLIES. As a violinist, he has shared his knowledge with The Ladsonian Foundation, Folk Alliance, The Noel Pointer School and NYC's Jazzmobile.

The legacy of African-American String Band music keeps Henrique and his cohorts, The EBONY HILLBILLIES, on the road retelling this slice of American history worldwide to an audience near you.